Connect with us

Lifestyle

5 things about Australian culture

Published

on

 

Catch a glimpse of the real Australia by checking out these 5 cultural qualities.

Australians are egalitarian

One concept Australians do hold in high regard is the idea of the ‘fair go’ — the belief that everyone should be given an equal opportunity — which manifests itself in universal support for publicly funded education and healthcare systems. Australians pride themselves on that deep-seated egalitarianism, shaking off the pompous class system of the historic motherland, Britain.

 

 

 

Australia is diverse

Australia doesn’t have one uniform national culture because the country is made up of so many different cultures thanks to waves of migration following European colonisation in the late 18th century. Joining the hundreds of Indigenous groups are those early British and Irish settlers, European immigrants following World War Two, then growing Asian and African communities in recent decades. In fact, a quarter of Australians were born overseas, and another quarter have at least a parent born abroad, too.

 

 

 

Australia is home to the oldest surviving civilisation on Earth

One of the most significant components of this multicultural milieu is Australia’s First Peoples, who represent the oldest continuously existing culture anywhere in the world. Archaeological evidence proves that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have inhabited the continent for 60,000 years, and today there are 650,000 Indigenous people in Australia, roughly 2.8% of the national population.

 

 

Australians are obsessed with sport

Aussies might not take themselves too seriously, but the same can’t be said when it comes to sport. From massive international events like the Australian Open tennis and the Formula One Grand Prix in Melbourne, to local leagues like the AFL and the NRL, along with the beloved summer of cricket to all the water sports that miles of golden coastline affords, Australia is a sports lover’s paradise.

 

 

Australians are tolerant

Study after study after study has shown that Australia is among the most open-minded nations on Earth, and it was put to the test last year with a postal survey on the issue of marriage equality. Despite months of distasteful public debate, 62% of Australians voted yes to legalising same-sex marriage — a thumping (and long overdue) victory for a country so proud of its progressive values.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

5 special Father’s Day gift delivery in Melbourne

Published

on

By

Father’s Day is fast approaching. Don’t let lockdown stop you from organising a gift for your dad, grandparent or any other special person in your life. These are the best gifts you can send straight to their door, or hold onto until you see them next.

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

5 unique hotels for your Melbourne staycation

Published

on

By

Escaping the every day doesn’t have to mean taking a flight if you live in the Victorian capital. Here are five Melbourne ‘staycation’ ideas that will leave you feeling refreshed and revitalised.

W Melbourne

The city’s first ‘luxury lifestyle hotel’ has taken up residence in Collins Arch at W Melbourne. Behind the Flinders Lane entry, bold pops of colour reflect the city’s laneway culture. And your pug or poodle is welcome to share your Cozy, Wonderful or Fabulous guestroom or suite for the night. 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTEL Melbourne

NOTEL takes glamping to the next level. Check-in with your smartphone to one of six luxury Airstream caravans. Perched atop a car-park rooftop, the sleek vans have everything you’d wish for. Fitted out with a queen bed and ready-to-raid minibar, not to mention a pretty spectacular view.

 

 

 

 

Lancemore Crossley St

The grit and glamour of concrete and velvet come together at the Lancemore. In the lobby, dramatic lighting hints at the surrounding theatre district. Upstairs, the 113 spacious art-filled rooms offer a luxurious retreat. And the guest-only rooftop terrace with fire pit and daybeds promises privacy. 

 

 

 

 

DoubleTree by Hilton

It’s all about the location at DoubleTree by Hilton. Opposite Flinders Street Station and moments from Fed Square, there’s a choice of river or city skyline views. Lounge in the Melbourne-inspired industrial-chic décor, showcasing local design and European features. 

 

 

 

 

QT Melbourne

With geometric patterns, sharp colours and luxe, industrial finishes, QT Melbourne oozes sophistication. Expect baths surrounded by curtains, black tiled walls and neon lights. Kick back with a G&T in the glamorous rooftop bar or new urban oasis, the Secret Garden Bar. 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

5 interesting facts about the Summer Olympics

Published

on

By

With the 2021 Tokyo Olympics has begun, let’s take a look at some interesting facts about the Summer Games which will take you by surprise.

 

1.  Olympic gold medals are not made up of gold

The practice of awarding pure gold medals to the Olympic medalists was last followed in 1912. The current Olympic gold medals are, in fact, made up of silver and plated with 6g of gold.

2.  Three Olympic Games in the modern era have been canceled

In the long history of the modern Olympic Games, only three Summer Olympics have been canceled. While the 1916 Berlin Olympics was canceled due to World War I, the 1940 Helsinki Olympics and 1944 London Olympics were canceled due to World War II.

3.  The 2021 Tokyo Olympic medals are made up of recycled electronic devices

The upcoming Tokyo Olympics will present athletes with medals composed of recycled electronic devices, including discarded laptops and smartphones. The devices were proactively donated by the citizens of Japan as the material for the medals.

4.  Only one athlete has won gold medals in both Summer and Winter Olympics

Eddie Eagan of America is the only athlete to win gold at the Summer as well as the Winter Olympics. He won his summer gold in boxing at the 1920 Games. At the 1932 Winter Olympics, Eagan clinched the gold in four-man bobsled.

/ Eddie Eagan of America

5.  At least one color of the Olympic Rings appears in every national flag

The founder of the modern Olympic movement, Pierre de Coubertin designed the Olympic symbol consisting of five rings colored in blue, yellow, black, green, and red with white in the center. These rings represent the five inhabited continents of the world. Interestingly, at least one of these colors is present in every national flag of every country.

Continue Reading

Trending


GIVEAWAY